Three women, Three perspectives

Photography is currently an element that influences us and our daily lives, so the fact that more women are behind the lens represents a vision and sensitivity about ourselves that we have never seen before.

We interview three female photographers every month and always ask them the same ten questions, we want to know what they think, what unites us and what makes us different. Here you have the best answers:

Interview by Laura Sodano for Naive Magazine

Martina Matencio

@lalovenenoso

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer:

Free, strong and nostalgic.

How many years have you been working in fashion photography?

6 years.

Do you consider photography as one more kind of expression, as a language?

Totally, photography takes part in my language and it is my own way of expression. I do not see or know a better way to show the world what I feel. The good thing about photography is that you can do thousands of things, there exists many ways to create, actually I think it is an infinite art. I always say that all my photos are the map I am building as time goes by until I finally reach the end and find myself.

What does fashion mean to you? What result do you look for when you start shooting in a session?

Coco Chanel said: “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening”, this was one of her biggest sayings. And I totally agree with this. For me fashion is a way of living, also a way of expression.

Unavoidable, I cannot stop consuming fashion and being updated with the latest trends but when I am working it is different, I generate from my inside, there are not such marked points, I try to flow regardless of the fashion of that moment.

How do you feel about being a woman photographer working in an industry dominated mainly by male photographers?

I really feel good, it is something I do not usually think about it, basically because as I do not understand it, I just do not even think about it. I try to always feel myself with the same right as men have and for now it has worked well. When I was working, there was a moment that I did not like at all, but I absolutely learnt a lot from that day and I became stronger than ever. I try not to let anyone to trample on me or feel less about being a woman. Step by step we are making bigger steps and I feel very proud about it.

Nowadays, exist many brands trying to break the barrier that divides the standards and the social reality. Do yo think there is any campaign or brand, in some way, leading a change vision in the industry?

Yes, I do. I think that little by little beauty standards are changing and becoming wider. There are brands that are pushing the boundaries. I think about Desigual with Winnie Harlow, a skin model with differents pigments, or Nike with its incorporation of Olympic and professional female athletes in their advertising contents. I would like to think that these are not just neoliberalism strategies to gain more potential buyers, bu that it is a truly paradigm shift.

As for the role of the model, fordecades she has been associated with exhibiting fashion designs, beauty products or art. Nevertheless, as a woman, do you consider that the role she plays goes beyond a product?

I think that a model, no matter the gender, is somehow a showcase for many things. The word itself says it: a model, a medium. In my case, for example, it is a very imporant element to be able to express myself. I need the models, but not as an object of exhibition, but as an element -almost essential- to show my art.

Do you think photography has the power to change the archaic social models in the industry?

Each historical moment has its paradigm and hegemonic discourse, that is those learned concepts that make us understand the world. The concept of beauty in the Italian Baroque is not the same as the concept that we have now, however, I believe that the unconscious language that we all speak is alive and in eternal construction. That is why I believe that photography has the power to dialogue with current models and to add new ones. In this way, we can tear down archaic models and carry new ones, perhaps more inclusive with the different realities that appear.

Marina De Luis

@marinadeluis

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer:

Real, sensitive and spontaneous.

How many years have you been working in fashion photography?

I started my career 5 years ago.

Do you consider photography as one more kind of expression, as a language? What does fashion mean to you?

I totally do. Especially in my early years, that was my greatest tool of expression. I was so afraid to speak and to say who I was and what I liked, I had many insecurities that I reflected through photography. It was like a kind of theraphy for me.

For me fashion is an art, a medium to express yourself and tell stories. When I started in the fashion industry, it looked something cold and distant to me, but I tried to take everything into my side, make it warmer, natural and spontaneous.

Nowadays, exist many brands trying to break the barrier that divides the standards and the social reality. Do yo think there is any campaign or brand, in some way, leading a change vision in the industry?

Yes, I think there are many brands trying to change perspectives and absorbing the reality that exists today. I like to see how big brands are integrating models into their campaigns that had previously “retired”. This movement of more adults and real models is very important to break down those myths about the perfect, young and slim model, that only hurt women.

Years ago there was a lot rivalry between women and I think, nowadays, this is getting and old thing. The “real” is increasingly important and I feel very attract to this fact. I think there must be variety and normalize it because that has been existing since always. These women cannot stay as a minority. We have to speak a plural language and to make all the world feel identified with a fashion campaign or with a brand. For that reason it is very important that some brands are hiring curvy models and, day after day, is less important the gender you were born with.

As for the role of the model, for decades she has been associated with exhibiting fashion designs, beauty products or art. Nevertheless, as a woman, do you consider that the role she plays goes beyond a product?

I love to portray women, it is what I like the most since I feel that I empathize much more with them. For that reason I know that her job is not easy. I hate the idea that in my photo sessions they might be treated as a product/object. I work hard to ensure that the work environment is the same to everyone, with the aim of getting a sincere final result and to transmit much more with it.

Do you think photography has the power to change the archaic social models in the industry?

These social models change thanks to the people who take risks to change them. I think the work begins with oneself, in how we direct that photo session, in what we want to transmit, in photographing more real people, in working with more women in a team. I think that if we are gradually changing the way we do things, we will reach a very positive change.

Miriam Serrano

@miriam__serrano

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer:

Curious, organic and dynamic.

How many years have you been working in fashion photography?

I have been doing fashion photography for two years, when I decided to leave Fine Arts and get into the world of the photography. However, documentary photography and videography, are two areas that emerged in my 14 years along with painting and natural drawing. From my vision, they are connected.

Who are your referents today?

Nowadays, I look for referents in my own experiencies, concerns, scenes that I observe on the street and, inclusive, in my dreams. But specially I look inside my own thoughts, I just try to express my brain, without obtaining external influences. References shouldn’t kill the authenticity of the photographer herself.

Do you consider photography and fashion as one more kind of expression, as a language?

Photography is the footprint that the human eye cannot record, it is an instant that we can keep forever. It is one of the greatest ways to express what the mind visualizes or gets worries about. It is more than a language. For me, it is constant naturalness, a way of living everyday with curiosity to capture my surroundings.

Fashion has become an important factor in human life, it is one piece more of the gear. It helps us to understand ourselves on a physical way and to create without limits on a blank canvas. In my opinion, fashion does not unerstand about money.

Do you consider yourself a feminist within the industry? How do you try to reflect this in your work?

I consider myself a feminist by nature. Last year I decided that the women I would portray, would be girls from my enviroment; in the most natural and organic way possible.

As for the role of the model, for decades she has been associated with exhibiting fashion designs, beauty products or art. Nevertheless, as a woman, do you consider that the role she plays goes beyond a product?

A woman herself is art, she has been used to promote products for her own attraction and sinuous body. If the woman creates the idea, develops it and sells it, it goes beyond the product itself. Nowadays, women have an important role, not only in the promotion but also in their own concept.

Do you think photography has the power to change the archaic social models in the industry?

Yes, I think so. The image is a powerful factor to reach every corners and change the youngest minds, which are going to be a near future.

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