Three women, Three perspectives

Photography is currently an element that influences us and our daily lives, so the fact that more women are behind the lens represents a vision and sensitivity about ourselves that we have never seen before.

We interview three female photographers every month and always ask them the same ten questions, we want to know what they think, what unites us and what makes us different. Here you have the best answers:

Interview by Laura Sodano for Naive Magazine

Leo Tornev

@leo_tornev

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer

I don’t like qualifiers, but we’re in the age of tag, so here I go: committed, dedicated and risky

How many years have you been working in fashion photography?

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Since mid 2016, I used to work as a commercial photographer.

Who were your referents that prompted you to start in photography? Who are your referents today?

My beginnings were defined by Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Doisneau, and Man Ray. I used to go down the street with my analog reflex and shoot to later develop in a home lab and create compositions superimposing negatives on my enlarger. I had a great time.

How do you feel about being a woman photographer working in an industry dominated mainly by male photographers?

I’m not really thinking about it. It is true that there are many male photographers, there are also many men who design women’s clothing. On the catwalks, the quota of women who design collections is less than 40%…
Still, I never thought being a woman could be a barrier to my life. The look of a male photographer on the body of the woman can be just as valid as the look of a female photographer, there are men who photograph with great sensitivity. It’s true that more and more women photographers are emerging in this industry, and I’m very happy about that. At the end when I look at art in general, what interests me is the sensitivity of the artist and for me the genre is not very relevant.

Do you think photography has the power to change the archaic social models in the industry?

Yes, photography has that power, as does art in general. As long as art, nipples, and other female parts are not censured, there is hope…
I don’t know, sometimes I think we live very ambivalent moments, on the one hand we have the rise of the female voice, and all these movements and on the other hand we tend to control the female body more than ever, the day we liberate the woman’s body from being controlled and labeled as something sexual, we will have won this fight for gender equality.

Chloe Romeyer

chloeromeyer.com

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer

Technical, Funny, Beauty

How many years have you been working in fashion photography?

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Five years

Who were your referents that prompted you to start in photography? Who are your referents today?

I loved, and still do, Paolo Roversi and Tim Walker but I can’t say they prompted me to start photography. I used to be an applied arts student and photography was my favorite medium. I don’t feel like I have referents or they’re too many to quote. I love lots of people’s work in fashion and in other fields. 

How do you feel about being a woman photographer working in an industry dominated mainly by male photographers?

As an assistant I had to prove all the time I was strong enough, fast enough and technical enough. I’ve been cancelled from jobs lastminute because I was a woman and so I wasn’t able to carry enough according to those people. I had to listen other techs doing sexist jokes about me without even realizing they were disrespectful. As a photographer, I feel like my work is speaking for me most of the time. We are living in a world mainly dominated by male and every women has to fight for respect in life and at work sometimes.

Do you consider yourself a feminist within the industry? How do you try to reflect this in your work?

As a person? I do. I’m not gonna say I’m trying to reflect it in my work because actually I don’t. I don’t ask myself this, I’m just trying to make pictures and have fun with the girls (because I actually don’t shoot men in my work). If I spend a good time with amazing people I feel like I’ve succeeded my day. I just hope my models feel secure with me and spend a cool day with nice people who where really attentive to them.

As for the role of the model, for decades she has been associated with exhibiting fashion designs, beauty products or art. Nevertheless, as a woman, do you consider that the role she plays goes beyond a product?

Casting is for me the most important part in beauty/fashion photography. The model is the story. She/he carries what you want people to feel by looking at your work. She/he is the main character, it’s close from the actress/actor role in a movie, they incarnate the story’s character. They have the most important role in the photography. 

Beatriz Conca

beatrizconca.com

Three adjectives that define you as a photographer

Persistent, natural and restless.

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Who were your referents that prompted you to start in photography? Who are your referents today?

My role models were Peter Lindbergh, Ellen Von Unwerth or Ferdinando Scianna. Nowadays they are Zoe Ghertner, Camilla Akrans, Karim Sadli or Thomas Slack.

How do you feel about being a woman photographer working in an industry dominated mainly by male photographers?

I try to make my work speak for itself, without the need to separate by gender.
But the truth is that when you see certain agencies representing photographers that only consist of men, you feel that there are intangible barriers that are going to be very difficult to break. Luckily, I think we are in a moment where every day there is more and more feminine representation and a lot of equality. I think that thanks to social networks these barriers are breaking down little by little, although there is still a lot of work to be done.

Is there any campaign or brand that you think is somehow leading a change of vision in the industry? (Feminism, queer concept…)

I think that there is still a lot of work to be done in that sense, it seems that sometimes it is just a passing trend than a real change. In that respect I like the Fenty brand, as it advocates for all kinds of women’s bodies, making them feel beautiful and in that aspect, empowering them.

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